webinar

Are your pumps ready for the new DOE regulations? 

For decades, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued market-changing industrial electric motor regulations to improve efficiency. The most recent rules, which have gone into effect over the past two years, impact most equipment manufacturers and users. Pump manufacturers, in particular, need to understand the impact motor speeds, operating speeds, inrush currents, motor size and motor configuration have on their pump designs and product development.

This webinar included a review of current U.S. Department of Energy regulations for Small and Integral Horsepower Electric Motors. One of our presenters, Peter Gaydon, Director of Technical Affairs with the Hydraulic Institute, discussed the new rules for clean water pumps, their effective date, the intended energy savings goals, and other considerations which will directly affect the sale and marketing of clean water pumps.

DATE of Webinar: Thursday, March 2, 2017 

If you missed the live webinar, please email Charli to request the presentation slides and video of the recorded portion of the webinar.

Addtional Resources: 

Pumps DOE rulemaking page

Pumps DOE FAQ page

Q&A Session of the Webinar: 

For VDF, Motor & Pump, where will the voltage readings be taken from? Is it from the Input to the VFDs or Output terminal of VFDs?
It is up to the manufacturer to verify that all testing and calculations are done per Appendix A to Subpart Y of 10CFR 431. At a minimum the bare pump must be tested to determine the best efficiency point and the pump power input at the required load points.  Per the sampling plan at least 2 pumps must be tested so that a mean PEI can be calculated.
The term “calculation” applies to the test method that uses default driver and control losses as outlined in sections III, V and VII of Appendix A to Subpart Y of 10 CFR 431.  These sections prescribe measuring the power into the pump shaft and applying default losses to determine the driver power input (sections III & V) or the driver and control losses (section VII).
The term “test” applies to measuring the power into the driver (Section IV) or control (VFD) (Section VI).  Per these test methods no default loss calculations are required because the manufacturer elected to test in a wire-to-water configuration.
The representative PEI is per a sampling plan as outlined §429.59   Pumps (a) Determination of represented value. http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5&node=10:3.0.1.4.17#se10.3.429_159
The manufacturer is required to list the method used to determine PEI in the certification reporting and DOE will use the same method that is listed in the certification when any auditing is conducted.
 

Is there a specific impeller spec that is used to test the motors?
PEI is determined based on the full impeller diameter of the basic model that is rated and subsequent trimmed impellers can be distributed in commerce under the same rated basic model number.
The manufacturer has the option to trim the impeller and re-designate the trimmed impeller as the full diameter under a new basic model.
Full impeller diameter means the maximum diameter impeller with which a given pump basic model is distributed in commerce.

How are trim diameters handled for PEI?
PEI is determined based on the full impeller diameter of the basic model that is rated and subsequent trimmed impellers can be distributed in commerce under the same rated basic model number.
The manufacturer has the option to trim the impeller and re-designate the trimmed impeller as the full diameter under a new basic model.
Full impeller diameter means the maximum diameter impeller with which a given pump basic model is distributed in commerce.

Are there any recommendations for getting efficiency curve information? Specifically how close manufactured resluts are to published curves?
 
For pumps w/in the scope, what will be labeled on the pumps?
The regulation indicates that rating and labeling is based on the configuration that the pump is sold.  In this case, bare pumps sold with electric motors (including inverter duty) but not with controls must be rated and labeled with a constant load pump energy index (PEICL).

Labeling requirements are shown in Table VI.1.

Table VI.1  Labeling.jpg

What about Motors with VFD is it excluded from the scope?

The definition of pump is inclusive of controls (VFD) so they are not excluded if distributed with a VFD.  Pumps distributed in commerce with a VFD can be tested and rated per section VI or VII of the Uniform Test Procedure. 
 
What kind of impact might this have on pump and other motor-driven equipment suppliers? Has there been a significant change in design or any related effect on OEMs?
 
I see circulators excluded and "coming soon" .  Will that also be regulated by 2020 to some standard?  I have heard circulators are also included in 2020 with ECM motors only.
The ASRAC working group completed term sheets in December of 2016 that recommend a testing procedures and standard levels for DOE to develop a Notice of Proposed Rule.  In the term sheet, the working group recommended that DOE publish the final rule by the end of 2017 with a 4 year grace period from the final publication in the Federal Register.  Following this timeline the industry could expect a compliance date near the end of 2021.  This estimate depends on DOE following through with publication of the final rule.  The standard level recommend by the ASRAC working group does not specify that ECM motors must be used, but to meet the energy requirements of the standard level, ECM motors will likely be required.
 
When will circulators be included ? 
See above

What is the min. pump eff. range for Clean Water pump?


The minimum efficiency is dependent on the C-Value published for the equipment class.  The standard level and C-Values are published at 10 CFR 431.465 (www.ecfr.gov) of the code of federal regulations.  The C-Value along with the pump best efficiency point (BEP) flow rate and pump specific speed (Ns) are used plugged into the minimum efficiency equation at Appendix A to subpart Y of Part 431 - (II) (B.1.1.1) to determine the minimum efficiency for the pump.

 

More about the Presenters:

John Malinowski, Senior Manager for Industry Affairs at Baldor Electric Company, A Member of the ABB Group in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

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John Malinowski is currently Chairman of NEMA 1MG Motor & Generator Section and familiar with collaborating with CEMEP and ABB IEC colleagues on global motor standards. Mr. Malinowski is a Senior Member of IEEE and is a Member at Large on the IEEE Industry Application Society Executive Board. He serves on the IEEE Pulp & Paper Industry Committee, and is also active with IEEE Petroleum and Chemical Industry Committee having recently rotated out of the Chair of the Chemical Subcommittee. He has served on several IEEE Standards Working Groups including several revisions of IEEE 841 and IEEE 303. He also served on API 541 and API 547 working groups. Mr. Malinowski has published several IEEE papers on efficiency standards, motor and drive efficiency, maintenance and applications. He acts as company advocate with government agencies, professional associations, and industry standards committees.

George Weihrauch,Product Manager at Baldor Electric Company, A Member of the ABB Group

George-Weihrauch-108x116.jpgGeorge Weihrauch is a Product Manager at Baldor Electric Company, A Member of the ABB Group. He holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Rutgers College of Engineering, and an MBA from Webster University. George has an extensive NEMA motor background in sales, applications and project management during his 26 years with Baldor. He is a member of IEEE, actively involved in the IEEE Standards Working Group for IEEE 841. An active contributor to Baldor, George has published several articles related to electric motor applications and energy efficiency, and is a regular presenter in webinars, conferences and training seminars. 

Peter Gaydon, Director of Technical Affairs with the Hydraulic Institute

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Peter Gaydon has held design, development and test engineering positions with major pump manufactures prior to joining the Hydraulic Institute in 2014.  He has technical responsibility for all standards, guidebooks and program guides published by the Hydraulic Institute.  Peter manages government affairs committees responsible for reviewing regulations related to pumps and was a member of the Appliance Standards Federal Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ASRAC) working group for circulators pumps.

If you have any questions about this webinar, contact Charli Matthews at charli@empoweringpumps.com.